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Most potting soils are ''soil-less. Pick Your Plants Many edible plants can be grown in containers. Potted herbs are a popular choice and can be placed in a sunny window or even on a patio. Herbs are compact, so they can easily be grown in a small space. Try chives, mint, basil, parsley, rosemary, sage, thyme and more. You can even grow fruit trees in containers. Dwarf varieties of trees, such as orange, fig, apple and pear, can with some effort grow in large containers.

These usually need to be protected or brought inside during the winter. Strawberries are another fruit easily grown in a pot; there are even special terra cotta pots with holes in them that are widely available. If vegetables are what you want, try greens such as arugula, lettuces, swiss chard and spinach. Smaller varieties of tomatoes, peas, pole beans, bush zucchini and peppers can also be grown successfully with some staking or trellis for them to climb. Consider Location Your first consideration for any garden project should be location: specifically, sunlight and exposure.

Container-grown plants tend to dry and wilt more quickly than plants in the ground. Does the space get full afternoon sun, or dappled shade? Is the area near a wall or blacktop, which increases ambient temperature? Will your containers sit outdoors in the rain, or on a covered porch or patio? Porches and patios might be the expected spots for container gardening, but here are some other ideas.

Tuck large pots into your landscaping or flower bed for an instant mini vegetable garden. Use containers to add height and visual interest in a planting bed. For example, a tier of flowerpots overflowing with blooms can bring a desirable vertical effect to a cutting garden. Find unexpected spots. Arrange a collection of container-grown herbs by your kitchen door for easy snipping.

Or, plant herbs in glass canning jars and place them on a sunny windowsill. Choose the Right Plants If you fancy a vegetable garden, choose plants that are specifically developed for containers, like "patio" varieties of tomato, zucchini, cucumber and peppers. Match your plant selection to your location as well. Plants labeled ''full sun'' require at least six hours per day of direct sunlight. Jan 24, piratesPencil rated it really liked it.

This little book contains an almost overwhelming amount of information, not just about apartment gardening but also about cooking, canning, bees, worm compost, DIY planters, urban foraging Definitely a good read if you want to garden in a small space. Aug 20, Melissa rated it liked it Shelves: non-fiction. Some good tips for later down the line, but nothing to solve my immediate plant woes. May 23, CC rated it really liked it. This book would serve as a good resource for people living in an apartment who want to do some urban gardening.

It functions more as a reference book than a straight-through read. The tips are practical and down-to-earth, many of which could be completed in an afternoon. Apartment Gardening was not so; ideas ranged from simple vermi This book would serve as a good resource for people living in an apartment who want to do some urban gardening. Apartment Gardening was not so; ideas ranged from simple vermiculture to using wine crates as planters.

I did not feel like any of the projects were too expensive or difficult, nor were they overly simplistic. My main fault with the book was a lack of complete reference to plants; the author seemed to pick and chose which plants she thought were most practical and did not address others. I did not try any of the recipes in the book, so I can't evaluate their merit, but the lavender chocolate tart looked absolutely amazing. Overall, I would definitely recommend this book to craft apartment-dwellers looking to get in touch with their green side.

Apr 16, Joscelin rated it it was ok. This book was a quick read and had some decent information in it for beginners, but I just saw a lot of things I personally didn't like. As many people pointed out, this book is geared towards those who have a decent sized balcony and who get decent light, which is not the reality for many, especially those living in very large, old metropolitan areas like Chicago or New York. Other issues I had: - She mentioned using plant lights but didn't mention that LED's are much more energy efficient and w This book was a quick read and had some decent information in it for beginners, but I just saw a lot of things I personally didn't like.

Other issues I had: - She mentioned using plant lights but didn't mention that LED's are much more energy efficient and will save you money. Honestly, don't bother unless it's an LED. If you have a dome this should be sufficient. The only thing I didn't like about this was that it seems that she keeps her plants under a dome until they are too big, which I don't do. They really only need to be under the dome while they germinate. As long as you keep your apartment warm during cold months, the plants will be fine.

I don't need to make my own plant labels out of tape and paper. Just buy popsicle sticks from the store, or if you really want, buy them from a garden center. Both options are easier and better than trying to make something out of scotch tape and paper. I also have just drawn a map of my plants when they were too small for a label. I'm sorry, but this is just horrible advice. Everyone should own a basic set of screwdrivers. It doesn't have to be anything fancy and will only cost a few dollars. At this point, I was just rolling my eyes. Maybe this is a generational thing, but I prefer not to bother my neighbors with requests to use their belongings.

Buy a freaking screwdriver lady. She also mentions in this paragraph that she doesn't like doing research with projects and just throws things together. This is also just bad advice. All this accomplishes is a shitty end product and a waste of time and money when it only lasts for a year. I'd much rather have a quality product and spend a little extra time with it than something that I'll need to replace or looks horrible in a year.

What a waste of money. Oh and then follows a list of projects you can make yourself that requires a drill, which apparently, she doesn't own. But I feel like this is a reality that many people just shouldn't try. Identifying foods can be very difficult and it's very easy to misidentify something and end up sick. Many places this also isn't really an option. I'm thinking about my area and there just wouldn' be much to forage. Not to mention the increased scrutiny that POC's face when doing anything really.

Overall, it's not a book that I would buy. I was able to borrow it through my library and read within a week. It included some food recipes and how to make your own lip balm, but I just kind of feel like this isn't worth the trouble. And the food was nothing I'd personally eat. Jun 10, Florence rated it really liked it. Definitely geared for people who have access to balconies of some sort. Sadly, if you don't have a lot of sunlight, I don't think you'll benefit much from this book. She doesn't push expensive solutions to you, and she's very practical. I hugely appreciated t Definitely geared for people who have access to balconies of some sort.

I hugely appreciated that.


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She also offers up some recipes for cooking, making tea, or cordials from the herbs you may grow. I was looking more for flowers in general, rather than vegetables, but the principles are broad enough that it all applies. She mentions some things for foraging that make me cringe a little be careful where you forage from, plants right next to roadways are not ideal, and an emphasis of making sure not to overharvest would have made it better.

But overall, a very enjoyable and quick intro to outdoor gardening for those with an apartment. Mar 11, Kelly rated it liked it. Apr 26, Lita Acevedo rated it liked it. Instructions for drying herbs and recipes for DIY plant based beauty products. The information was good but I wanted pictures.

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Sep 17, Esther Marie rated it really liked it Shelves: I love Amy Pennington's books! This is a small and wonderful book that gives some quick and thrifty tips for how to garden in an apartment. A great gift for yourself or another apartment dweller! Jan 08, Jessica Thurlow rated it liked it Shelves: cookbook , educational. Some good information for first time gardeners i.

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While I appreciate learning about new foods to try, this information doesn't help me learn how to care for my celery, onions, or broc Some good information for first time gardeners i. While I appreciate learning about new foods to try, this information doesn't help me learn how to care for my celery, onions, or broccoli. Pennington also includes some recipes and designs for DIY projects and ways to use the things you harvest from your garden wholly and in unique ways. Debra Lee Baldwin. Steve Bender. Tammy Wylie. Barbara Pleasant. Linda Jones.

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